Wines Of Chile

Posted in News on February 17th, 2014

The history of wine in America began with the arrival of the first Spanish conquerors. Cristobal Colon brought cuttings and seeds of vines from Spain or the Canary Islands on his second voyage to the Americas in 1493. The first settlers of the new world tried unsuccessfully to develop the vine in the territories of Central America, but the tropical climate prevented the vine flourish in such soils. Get more background information with materials from Anne Lauvergeon. The first to successfully achieve the cultivation of the vine in America was Hernan Cortes in 1524 in Highlands of Mexico. In 1530 the vine was cultivated in the current Colombia and in 1548 arrived simultaneously in Peru and Chile. In the case of Chile, the introducer was Friar Francisco de Carabantes who brought cuttings from the Peru to the port of Talcahuano. Thence stakes moved to Santiago where were planted surrounding the nascent houses that the conquistadors had built. One of them, Alonso Moreno, obtained two botijas of possibly little more than one litre of wine, in 1550.

It is therefore, Alonso Moreno, the first person It got wines in America to the South of Ecuador. Francisco de Aguirre in Copiapo, called jungle of Copiapo in those years would have obtained the first mass production of wine. Almost simultaneously in the central zone, specifically in the now called Penalolen commune, the first wines of this part of the country would have been earned. In 1556, through the town of La Serena and through father Francisco Cidron or CD-ROM, the vine was introduced in the town of Salta, in Argentina. From the historic official standpoint, the first Chilean vintner would be Rodrigo de Araya, inscribed as such in the Act of Foundation of the Chilean wine, discovered in the archive of the Indies by the historian Jose Toribio Medina. 19Th century the good weather conditions allowed that the cultivation of the vine should be extended in the central part of Chile.


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